Western Heritage Museum

Normally, I wouldn’t consider going to The Nation Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. I have little love for Westerns in TV and film. While I find history interesting, my tastes tend to go further back and toward Europe. The displays where you could photograph were so dim that often I was in H2 which for my camera is two stops below ISO 6400. Ironically, they had whole rooms of well-lit art; paintings, statuary, bronzes, etc. These were items for sale. Since the museum didn’t own them, no photography. Even the visiting exhibits were adequately lit; no photography. The rest was lit with 10w penlights. Seriously, your eyesight was dazzled by how bright the connecting hallways were before you went spelunking back into the exhibits.

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2 Comments

  1. Wil C. Fry

    Oh, how I agree with you. We visited (and really enjoyed visiting!) this museum a few years ago, but I was struck with how restrictive they were about photography, and (as you said) when it *was* allowed, things were just too dark.

    There’s a research library somewhere on the grounds, and my Mom went in for a few minutes to look around. When I leaned in the door to signal to her, no less than four employees *leapt* toward me, concerned about the camera around my neck (lens cap in place, camera dangling by neckstrap, no danger of accidentally taking a picture of their precious research materials). I determined I wouldn’t go back, except maybe someday to show the kids (if they beg for it.)

    Reply
  2. Wil C. Fry

    It does look like you were able to capture some nice images, all things considered. 🙂

    Reply

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